Architects: Marià Castelló Martínez

Location: 
Collaborators: Marga Ferrer, Laura Tur, Carmen Martínez, Josep Castelló, Catalina Verdera, Jaume Luís, Segundo García, Pep Yern y Belén Molina
Area: 201 sqm
Completion: 2011

Photographs: Estudi Epdse

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Programme

The north‐south orientation of the proposal generates a duality that was required by the programme and that the ground plan radically synthesizes: segregation of the more public activity from private life. The north side is the most exposed; it is clearly visible from kilometre 2.3 on the CamíVell de la Mola, the main approach route.

On the north side there is a small architecture studio, repeated on the south side in the form of a space of identical dimensions, designed as a small dwelling‐refuge for a couple. As well as seeking sunlight, the orientation of the refuge responds to the desire to appropriate the small wood of common and Phoenician juniper and rosemary that extends like a native garden, requiring no transformation or maintenance, and generates a high level of privacy.

Between the studio and the dwelling is a nucleus of services that separates work from private life: bookshelves, files, bath‐ room, kitchen, beds, cupboards, installations and two sliding walls to divide up the two main areas and create more intimate spaces, such as an annexed office or a guest room. This makes the house both flexible and multifunctional. The envelope containing the programme (12×12 m) extends in the two main directions, generating spaces of transition that are vital in these latitudes.

Matter


The volume is defined by an envelope of rendered thermo‐clay masonry and reinforced concrete. An extruded section represents the only part where masonry is used on the site. The other interior and exterior facings were dry assembled, using glass and iroko timber. A small setback around the edge in section creates the sensation that the building is floating over the site. This is the transition between an artificial world and the pre‐ existing organic environment.






Bondi Penthouse / MPR Design Group

Architects: MPR Design Group
Location: Bondi, , Australia
Design Team: Kevin Ng and Brian Meyerson
Year: 2010
Area: Approximately 180 sqm
Photographs: Brett Boardman



The fundamental architectural proposition explored in this project was how do you add to a building which has its own history and place within the existing iconic environment of Campbell Parade. The design response was to place a lightweight metal clad structure onto the roof of the existing “art deco” building. This white pristine metallic cladding with its irregular jointing patterns make for a strong visual contrast to the rendered masonry building below. As a formal gesture, the project is an exercise of clear delineation between the contemporary new structure and the old building.





Generous light filled open living spaces flow onto expansive external entertaining areas with a full view of the beach and the sweep of Bondi Bay. Fire regulations restricted the amount of glazing allowed which meant a clever use of skylights, fire windows, low level glass louvres and full height glazing in central areas, ensuring filtered light throughout. External and internal lines are blurred due to the white metallic cladding with its intricate random patterning flowing into the interior wall and ceiling. Other devices such as an external horizontal blade are employed to form a daybed and create a continuous floating joinery element.

Materials & Detailing Intent:
A palette of light textured materials including wide lime washed timber floor boards, white and silver Alucobond cladding, limestone and Calacutta marble were used to create a bright and airy interior. White Alucobond cladding lines the central corridor and is offset by a colorful photographic image of the sunset by a local photographer complimented by the water feature which flows below. Joints are expressed and are used in the ceiling to integrate the LED light fittings.

A central island Calacutta marble bench top formed the centre piece of the kitchen which is otherwise understated in white with stainless steel bench top and splash backs. Materials are consistently generous with the use of monolithic limestone slabs in the bathrooms limiting the number of joints and wide timber boards are used for the interior and exterior living spaces.










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